National Press Photographers Association

Jim Brandenburg is an American photographer originally from Minnesota, born in the year of 1945 and with over 30 years of experience in the artistic and naturalistic photography technique which is one of the main lenses from National Geographic during more than three decades. Although it has also participated actively in other North American and international photographic publications such as New York Times, Life, Time, Audubon, Smithsonian, Natural History, GEO, Modern Maturity, BBC Wildlife, Outdoor Photographer, National Wildlife, and Outside. Brandenburg was commissioned by The United States Postal Service to create a collection of stamps on wildlife, which were printed and taken to the middle of May 14, 1981. Similarly, his career at the National Geographic Society gave as a result 23 different photo reports taken in magazines, several television appearances and publishing many books for National Geographic, contributions like these to photography is what makes it one of the leading masters of the art photography still convida and working. In the course of his long career, Brandenburg has received many prestigious national and international honors for his work. The National Press Photographers Association (NPPA) twice named him as the photographer of the year for his work the magazine National Geographic. He was named Kodak photographer of the year of wildlife by the BBC Wildlife Magazine and London’s Natural History Museum, and was the winner of the prize to the path by the Association of photographers of the nature of North America (NANPA). Read more here: Danny Meyer.

Brandenburg has been Hasselblad master in 2002, a legend behind the lens in 2001 Nikon, and the Explorer of Canon of the Luz 2005-08. He has also tried to rescue the representation of women in art photography producing several documentaries of naturalistic character for channels such as Animal Planet, NatGeo, NBC, Dataline and other well-known audivisual media and popular around the world. Jim Brandenburg has established a certain style of photographers nature, above all in the technique. In his tenure of 25 years with National Geographic, Brandenburg traveled the world taking pictures for the magazine. In projects, Brandenburg was found taking a maximum of 300 rolls of film just so that a dozen of selected for published articles. Listed among his influences are environmentalists such as Aldo Leopold and Sigurd. F. Olson. Some personal influences: Jim Vance editor of the daily Globe Worthington, Glenn Maxham a photojournalist at the public television station, at the University where he worked, Art Aufderheide who introduced him to the people Inuit in the territories of the Northwest, Canada; and the great Henri Cartier-Bresson who would dial it in his artistic tendencies.